Lab: Implementing operational monitoring in hybrid scenarios

Lab scenario

You need to evaluate Microsoft Azure functionality that would provide insight into the performance and configuration of Azure resources, focusing in particular on Azure virtual machines (VMs). To accomplish this, you intend to examine the capabilities of Azure Monitor, including Log Analytics.

Note: An interactive lab simulation is available that allows you to click through this lab at your own pace. You may find slight differences between the interactive simulation and the hosted lab, but the core concepts and ideas being demonstrated are the same.

Objectives

After completing this lab, you’ll be able to:

  • Prepare a monitoring environment.
  • Configure monitoring of on-premises servers.
  • Configure monitoring of Azure VMs.
  • Evaluate monitoring services.

Estimated time: 60 minutes

Lab Environment

Virtual machines: AZ-801T00A-SEA-DC1 and AZ-801T00A-SEA-SVR2 must be running. Other VMs can be running, but they aren’t required for this lab.

Note: AZ-801T00A-SEA-DC1 and AZ-801T00A-SEA-SVR2 virtual machines are hosting the installation of SEA-DC1 and SEA-SVR2.

  1. Select SEA-SVR2.
  2. Sign in using the following credentials:

    • Username: Administrator
    • Password: Pa55w.rd
    • Domain: CONTOSO

For this lab, you’ll use the available VM environment and an Azure subscription. Before you begin the lab, ensure that you have an Azure subscription and a user account with the Owner role in that subscription.

Exercise 1: Preparing a monitoring environment

The main tasks for this exercise are to:

  1. Deploy an Azure virtual machine.
  2. Register the Microsoft.Insights and Microsoft.AlertsManagement resource providers.
  3. Create and configure an Azure Log Analytics workspace.

Task 1: Deploy an Azure virtual machine

In this task, you will deploy a virtual machine that will be used to test monitoring scenarios.

  1. On SEA-SVR2, start Microsoft Edge, go to the Azure portal, and sign in by using credentials of a user account with the Owner role in the subscription you’ll be using in this lab.
  2. On SEA-SVR2, in the Microsoft Edge window displaying the Azure portal, open a PowerShell session in Azure Cloud Shell.
  3. In the Cloud Shell pane, upload the C:\Labfiles\Lab02\L02-sub_template.json, C:\Labfiles\Lab09\L09-rg_template.json, and C:\Labfiles\Lab09\L09-rg_template.parameters.json files into the Cloud Shell home directory.
  4. To create the resource group that will be hosting the lab environment, in the PowerShell session in the Cloud Shell pane, run the following commands (replace the <Azure_region> placeholder with the name of an Azure region where you intend to deploy resources in this lab):

    Note: You can use the (Get-AzLocation).Location command to list the names of available Azure regions:

    $location = '<Azure_region>'
    $rgName = 'AZ801-L0901-RG'
    New-AzResourceGroup -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $location
    
  5. To deploy an Azure VM into the newly created resource group, run the following command:

    New-AzResourceGroupDeployment -Name az801l0901deployment -ResourceGroupName $rgName -TemplateFile ./L09-rg_template.json -TemplateParameterFile ./L09-rg_template.parameters.json -AsJob
    

    Note: Do not wait for the deployment to complete but instead proceed to the next task. The deployment should take about 3 minutes.

Task 2: Register the Microsoft.Insights and Microsoft.AlertsManagement resource providers

  1. To register the Microsoft.Insights and Microsoft.AlertsManagement resource providers, on SEA-SVR2, from the Cloud Shell pane, run the following commands:

    Register-AzResourceProvider -ProviderNamespace Microsoft.Insights
    Register-AzResourceProvider -ProviderNamespace Microsoft.AlertsManagement
    

    Note: To verify the registration status, you can use the Get-AzResourceProvider cmdlet.

    Note: Do not wait for the registration process to complete but instead proceed to the next task. The registration should take about 3 minutes.

  2. Close Cloud Shell.

Task 3: Create and configure an Azure Log Analytics workspace

In this task, you will create and configure an Azure Log Analytics workspace and Azure Automation-based solutions.

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, create a Log Analytics workspace with the following settings:

    Settings Value
    Subscription the name of the Azure subscription you are using in this lab
    Resource group the name of a new resource group AZ801-L0902-RG
    Log Analytics Workspace any unique name
    Region the name of the Azure region into which you deployed the virtual machine in the previous task

    Note: Make sure that you specify the same region into which you deployed virtual machines in the previous task.

    Note: Wait for the deployment to complete. The deployment should take about 1 minute.

  2. In the Azure portal, navigate to the blade of the newly provisioned workspace.
  3. On the workspace blade, navigate to the Agents management blade and record the values of the Workspace ID and Primary key. You will need them in the next exercise.

Task 4: Install Service Map solution

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, search for the Service Map Marketplace item and navigate to the corresponding blade.
  2. From the Create Service Map Solution blade, create the Service Map solution with the following settings:

    Settings Value
    Subscription the name of the Azure subscription you are using in this lab
    Resource group AZ801-L0902-RG
    Log Analytics Workspace the name of the Log Analytics workspace you created in the previous task

Exercise 2: Configuring monitoring of on-premises servers

The main task for this exercise is to:

  1. Install the Log Analytics agent and the Dependency agent

Task 1: Install the Log Analytics agent and the Dependency agent

  1. While connected to the console session on SEA-SVR2, in the browser window displaying the Azure portal, from the Agents management blade, download the 64-bit Windows Log Analytics agent.
  2. Install the agent with the default settings. When prompted, enter the Workspace ID and Workspace Key (Primary Key) you recorded in the previous exercise.
  3. On SEA-SVR2, start Windows PowerShell as administrator and, from the Administrator: Windows PowerShell console, run the following commands to install Dependency Agent:

    Invoke-WebRequest "https://aka.ms/dependencyagentwindows" -OutFile InstallDependencyAgent-Windows.exe
    .\InstallDependencyAgent-Windows.exe /S
    

Exercise 3: Configuring monitoring of Azure VMs

The main tasks for this exercise are to:

  1. Review host-based monitoring.
  2. Configure diagnostic settings and VM Insights.

Task 1: Review host-based monitoring

In this task, you will review default monitoring settings of Azure virtual machines.

  1. In the Azure portal, browse to the az801l09-vm0 virtual machine page.
  2. On the az801l09-vm0 page, in the Monitoring section, select Metrics.
  3. On the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, on the default chart, in the Metric Namespace drop-down list, note that only Virtual Machine Host metrics are available.

    Note: This is expected because no guest-level diagnostic settings have been configured yet. However, you do have the option of enabling guest memory metrics directly from the Metrics Namespace drop down-list. You will enable it later in this exercise.

  4. In the Metric drop-down list, review the list of available metrics.

    Note: The list includes a range of CPU, disk, and network-related metrics that can be collected from the virtual machine host, without having access into guest-level metrics.

  5. On the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, display the chart illustrating the average percentage CPU utilization of az801l09-vm0.

Task 2: Configure diagnostic settings and VM Insights

In this task, you will configure Azure virtual machine diagnostic settings.

  1. On the az801l09-vm0 page, in the Monitoring section, select Diagnostic settings and enable guest-level monitoring.

    Note: Wait for the operation to take effect. This might take about 3 minutes.

  2. Switch to the Performance counters tab of the az801l09-vm0 | Diagnostic settings page and review the available counters.

    Note: By default, CPU, memory, disk, and network counters are enabled. You can switch to the Custom view for more detailed listing.

  3. Switch to the Logs tab of the az801l09-vm0 | Diagnostic settings page and enable guest-level monitoring.

    Note: Wait until the guest-level monitoring diagnostics are enabled. This should take about 3 minutes.

  4. On the az801l09-vm00 | Diagnostic settings page, on the Overview tab, review the available event log collection options.

    Note: By default, log collection includes critical, error, and warning entries from the Application Log and System log, as well as Audit failure entries from the Security log. You can customize them from the Logs tab.

  5. On the az801l09-vm0 | Diagnostic settings page, select the Logs tab and review the available configuration settings.
  6. On the az801l09-vm0 | Logs page, in the vertical menu on the left side, in the Monitoring section, select Metrics.
  7. On the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, on the default chart, note that at this point, the Metrics Namespace drop-down list, in addition to the Virtual Machine Host entry includes also the Guest (classic) entry.

    Note: This is expected because you enabled guest-level diagnostic settings. You also have the option to Enable new guest memory metrics.

  8. In the Metrics Namespace drop-down list, select the Guest (classic) entry.
  9. In the Metric drop-down list, review the list of available metrics and note that they include a range of metrics related to memory and logical disks.

    Note: The list includes additional guest-level metrics not available when relying on the host-level monitoring only.

  10. Using the option in the Metrics Namespace drop-down list, enable new guest memory metrics by following the instructions provided in the Azure portal.
  11. Browse back to the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, on the default chart, note that at this point, the Metrics Namespace drop-down list, in addition to the Virtual Machine Host and Guest (classic) entries, also includes the Virtual Machine Guest entry.

    Note: You might need to refresh the page for the Virtual Machine Guest entry to appear.

  12. On the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, on the vertical menu on the left side, in the Monitoring section, select Logs.
  13. On the az801l09-vm0 | Logs page, enable log collection to the Log Analytics workspace you created earlier in this lab.
  14. Browse to the az801l09-vm0 | Insights page and enable the Azure Monitor VM Insights functionality.

    Note: VM Insights is an Azure Monitor solution that facilitates monitoring performance and health of both Azure VMs and on-premises computers running Windows or Linux.

  15. On SEA-SVR2, browse to the Monitor | Virtual Machines page and upgrade Performance and Map functionality of the workspace you created earlier in this lab.

    Note: This option enables monitoring and alerting capabilities using health model, which consists of a hierarchy of health monitors built using metrics emitted by Azure Monitor for VMs.

Exercise 4: Evaluating monitoring services

The main tasks for this exercise are to:

  1. Review Azure Monitor monitoring and alerting functionality.
  2. Review Azure Monitor VM Insights functionality.
  3. Review Azure Log Analytics functionality.

Task 1: Review Azure Monitor monitoring and alerting functionality

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, browse back to the Monitor | Metrics blade.
  2. Set the scope to the az801l09-vm0 virtual machine.

    Note: This gives you the same view and options as those available from the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page.

  3. On the az801l09-vm0 | Metrics page, display the chart illustrating the average percentage CPU utilization of az801l09-vm0.
  4. From the Avg Percentage CPU for az801l09-vm0 pane on the Monitor | Metrics page, create a new alert rule for average percentage of CPU utilization for az801l09-vm0 with the following signal logic settings:

    Settings Value
    Threshold Static
    Operator Greater than
    Aggregation type Average
    Threshold value 2
    Aggregation granularity (Period) 1 minute
    Frequency of evaluation Every 1 Minute

    Note: Creating an alert rule from Metrics is not supported for metrics from the Guest (classic) metric namespace. This can be accomplished by using Azure Resource Manager templates, as described in the document Send Guest OS metrics to the Azure Monitor metric store using a Resource Manager template for a Windows virtual machine.

  5. Create an action group for the new alert rule with the following settings (leave others with their default values) and select Next: Notifications >:

    Settings Value
    Subscription the name of the Azure subscription you are using in this lab
    Resource group AZ801-L0902-RG
    Action group name az801l09-ag1
    Display name az801l09-ag1
    Notification type Email/SMS/Push/Voice
    Notification name admin email
    Notification email address your email address
  6. Configure alert rule details according to the following settings (leave others with their default values):

    Settings Value
    Alert rule name CPU Percentage above the test threshold
    Description CPU Percentage above the test threshold
    Resource group AZ801-L0902-RG
    Severity Sev 3
    Enable rule upon creation Yes

    Note: It can take up to 10 minutes for a metric alert rule to become active.

  7. In the Azure portal, browse to the az801l09-vm0 virtual machine page.
  8. On the az801l09-vm0 page, in the Operations section, use the Run command RunPowerShellScript functionality to run the following commands that are supposed to increase the CPU utilization within the target operating system and trigger an alert based on the newly configured rule:

    $vCpuCount = Get-WmiObject Win32_Processor | Select-Object -ExpandProperty NumberOfLogicalProcessors
    ForEach ($vCpu in 1..$vCpuCount){ 
       Start-Job -ScriptBlock{
          $result = 1;
          ForEach ($loopCount in 1..2147483647){
             $result = $result * $loopCount
          }
       }
    }
    
  9. On SEA-SVR2, in the Microsoft Edge window displaying the Azure portal, open another tab and browse to the Alerts page of Azure Monitor.
  10. Review the list of alerts and display the details of the Sev 3 alerts generated by the alert rule you created.

    Note: You might need to wait for a few minutes and select Refresh.

Task 2: Review Azure Monitor VM Insights functionality

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, browse back to the az801l09-vm0 virtual machine page.
  2. On the az801l09-vm0 virtual machine page, on the vertical menu on the left side, in the Monitoring section, select Insights.
  3. On the az801l09-vm0 | Insights page, on the Performance tab, review the default set of metrics, including logical disk performance, CPU utilization, available memory, as well as bytes sent and received rates.
  4. On the az801l09-vm0 | Insights page, select the Map tab and review the autogenerated map.
  5. On the az801l09-vm0 | Insights page, select the Health tab and review its content.

    Note: The availability of health information is dependent on completion of the workspace upgrade.

Task 3: Review Azure Log Analytics functionality

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, browse back to the Monitor page and select Logs.
  2. On the Select a scope page, use the Recent tab to select the unique workspace you created earlier in this lab, and then select Apply.
  3. In the query window, run the following query and review the resulting chart:

    // Virtual Machine available memory
    // Chart the VM's available memory over the last hour.
    InsightsMetrics
    | where TimeGenerated > ago(1h)
    | where Name == "AvailableMB"
    | project TimeGenerated, Name, Val
    | render timechart
    
  4. Select Queries in the toolbar, in the Queries pane, expand the Virtual machines node, review and run the Track VM availability query and review the results.
  5. On the New Query 1 tab, select the Tables header, and review the list of tables in the Azure Monitor for VMs section.

    Note: The names of several tables correspond to the solutions you installed earlier in this lab. In particular, InsightMetrics is used by Azure VM Insights to store performance metrics.

  6. Move the cursor over the VMComputer entry, select the See Preview data icon, and review the results.

    Note: Verify that the data includes entries for both az801l09-vm0 and SEA-SVR2.contoso.com.

    Note: You might need to wait a few minutes before the update data becomes available.

  7. On SEA-SVR2, in the Azure portal, browse to the page of the Log Analytics workspaces you created earlier in this lab.
  8. From the workspace page, browse to its Solutions page.
  9. From the Solutions page, browse to the page of the Service Map solution.
  10. On the ServiceMap page, on the Machines tab, select SEA-SVR2 to display is service map.
  11. Zoom in to review the map illustrating the network ports available on SEA-SVR2, select different ports and review the corresponding connection information.
  12. For each connection, switch between the Summary and Properties views, with the latter providing more detailed information regarding connection targets.

Exercise 5: Deprovisioning the Azure environment

The main tasks for this exercise are to:

  1. Start a PowerShell session in Cloud Shell.
  2. Delete all Azure resources provisioned in the lab.

Task 1: Start a PowerShell session in Cloud Shell

  1. On SEA-SVR2, in the Microsoft Edge window displaying the Azure portal, open the Cloud Shell pane by selecting the Cloud Shell icon.

Task 2: Delete all Azure resources provisioned in the lab

  1. From the Cloud Shell pane, run the following command to list all resource groups created in this lab:

    Get-AzResourceGroup -Name 'AZ801-L09*'
    

    Note: Verify that the output contains only the resource groups you created in this lab. These groups will be deleted in this task.

  2. Run the following command to delete all resource groups you created in this lab:

    Get-AzResourceGroup -Name 'AZ801-L09*' | Remove-AzResourceGroup -Force -AsJob
    

    Note: The command executes asynchronously (as determined by the -AsJob parameter). So while you’ll be able to run another PowerShell command immediately afterwards within the same PowerShell session, it will take a few minutes before the resource groups are actually removed.

Review

In this lab, you have:

  • Prepared a monitoring environment.
  • Configured monitoring of on-premises servers.
  • Configured monitoring of Azure VMs.
  • Evaluated monitoring services.