M01-Unit 8 Connect two Azure Virtual Networks using global virtual network peering

Exercise scenario

In this unit, you will configure connectivity between the CoreServicesVnet and the ManufacturingVnet by adding peerings to allow traffic flow.

In this unit, you will:

  • Task 1: Create a Virtual Machine to test the configuration
  • Task 2: Connect to the Test VMs using RDP
  • Task 3: Test the connection between the VMs
  • Task 4: Create VNet peerings between CoreServicesVnet and ManufacturingVnet
  • Task 5: Test the connection between the VMs
  • Task 6: Clean up resources

Task 1: Create a Virtual Machine to test the configuration

In this section, you will create a test VM on the Manufacturing VNet to test if you can access resources inside another Azure virtual network from your ManufacturingVnet.

Create ManufacturingVM

  1. In the Azure portal, open the PowerShell session within the Cloud Shell pane.

  2. In the toolbar of the Cloud Shell pane, select the Upload/Download files icon, in the drop-down menu, select Upload and upload the following files ManufacturingVMazuredeploy.json and ManufacturingVMazuredeploy.parameters.json into the Cloud Shell home directory one by one from the source folder F:\Allfiles\Exercises\M01.

  3. Deploy the following ARM templates to create the VMs needed for this exercise:

    $RGName = "ContosoResourceGroup"
       
    New-AzResourceGroupDeployment -ResourceGroupName $RGName -TemplateFile ManufacturingVMazuredeploy.json -TemplateParameterFile ManufacturingVMazuredeploy.parameters.json
    
  4. When the deployment is complete, go to the Azure portal home page, and then select Virtual Machines.

  5. Verify that the virtual machine has been created.

Task 2: Connect to the Test VMs using RDP

  1. On the Azure Portal home page, select Virtual Machines.

  2. Select ManufacturingVM.

  3. In ManufacturingVM, select Connect > RDP.

  4. In ManufacturingVM Connect, select Download RDP file.
  5. Save the RDP file to your desktop.

  6. Connect to ManufacturingVM using the RDP file, and the username TestUser and the password TestPa$$w0rd!.

  7. On the Azure Portal home page, select Virtual Machines.

  8. Select TestVM1.

  9. In TestVM1, select Connect > RDP.

  10. In TestVM1 Connect, select Download RDP file.
  11. Save the RDP file to your desktop.

  12. Connect to TestVM1 using the RDP file, and the username TestUser and the password TestPa$$w0rd!.

  13. On both VMs, in Choose privacy settings for your device, select Accept.

  14. On both VMs, in Networks, select Yes.

  15. On TestVM1, open a PowerShell prompt, and run the following command: ipconfig

  16. Note the IPv4 address.

Task 3: Test the connection between the VMs

  1. On the ManufacturingVM, open a PowerShell prompt.

  2. Use the following command to verify that there is no connection to TestVM1 on CoreServicesVnet. Be sure to use the IPv4 address for TestVM1.

     Test-NetConnection 10.20.20.4 -port 3389
    
  3. The test connection should fail, and you will see a result similar to the following: PowerShell window with Test-NetConnection 10.20.20.4 -port 3389 showing failed

Task 4: Create VNet peerings between CoreServicesVnet and ManufacturingVnet

  1. On the Azure home page, select Virtual Networks, and then select CoreServicesVnet.

  2. In CoreServicesVnet, under Settings, select Peerings. screen shot of core services VNet Peering settings

  3. On CoreServicesVnet Peerings, select + Add.
  4. Use the information in the following table to create the peering.
Section Option Value
This virtual network    
  Peering link name CoreServicesVnet-to-ManufacturingVnet
  Traffic to remote virtual network Allow (default)
  Traffic forwarded from remote virtual network Allow (default)
  Virtual network gateway or Route Server None (default)
Remote virtual network    
  Peering link name ManufacturingVnet-to-CoreServicesVnet
  Virtual network deployment model Resource manager
  I know my resource ID Not selected
  Subscription MOC Subscription-lodxxxxxxxx
  Virtual network ManufacturingVnet
  Traffic to remote virtual network Allow (default)
  Traffic forwarded from remote virtual network Allow (default)
  Virtual network gateway or Route Server None (default)
Review your settings and select Add.    
     

Note: If you don’t have a “MOC Subscription”, use the subscription you’ve been using previously. It’s just a name.

  1. In CoreServicesVnet Peerings, verify that the CoreServicesVnet-to-ManufacturingVnet peering is listed.
  2. Under Virtual networks, select ManufacturingVnet, and verify the ManufacturingVnet-to-CoreServicesVnet peering is listed.

Task 5: Test the connection between the VMs

  1. On the ManufacturingVM, open a PowerShell prompt.

  2. Use the following command to verify that there is now a connection to TestVM1 on CoreServicesVnet.

     Test-NetConnection 10.20.20.4 -port 3389
    
  3. The test connection should succeed, and you will see a result similar to the following: Powershell window with Test-NetConnection 10.20.20.4 -port 3389 showing TCP test succeeded: true

Congratulations! You have successful configured connectivity between VNets by adding peerings.

Task 6: Clean up resources

Note: Remember to remove any newly created Azure resources that you no longer use. Removing unused resources ensures you will not see unexpected charges.

  1. In the Azure portal, open the PowerShell session within the Cloud Shell pane. (Create Cloud Shell storage if needed, using default settings.)

  2. Delete all resource groups you created throughout the labs of this module by running the following command:

    Remove-AzResourceGroup -Name 'ContosoResourceGroup' -Force -AsJob
    

    Note: The command executes asynchronously (as determined by the -AsJob parameter), so while you will be able to run another PowerShell command immediately afterwards within the same PowerShell session, it will take a few minutes before the resource groups are actually removed.